“Incredibly Disappointed:” Civil Groups Decry Weak COP18 Deal Amid Proof of Climate Change

Amy Goodman
Democracy Now! / Video Report
Published: Monday 10 December 2012
The so-called Doha Climate Gateway extends the Kyoto Protocol for eight more years and paves the way for talks on a new, global U.N. pact to enter into force in 2020.

The United Nations Climate Change summit ended Saturday after negotiators agreed to a weakened deal that will do nothing to halt rising world greenhouse gas emissions. The so-called Doha Climate Gateway extends the Kyoto Protocol for eight more years and paves the way for talks on a new, global U.N. pact to enter into force in 2020. Under the deal, the United States made no new pledge to cut its greenhouse gas emissions or to increase its aid to nations suffering from the impact of climate change. "We expected, going into Doha, that after the President mentioned climate change in his inaugural speech, after Hurricane Sandy, after discussions amongst high level politicians in the U.S., we expected a pivot on climate policy, and we saw instead exactly the same kind of tactics that we've seen for the last four years from the United States," says Samantha Smith of the World Wildlife Fund's Global Climate and Energy Initiative. "We think it's time for President Obama to step forward to start a national conversation about climate change."



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ABOUT Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman is the host of "Democracy Now!," a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 900 stations in North America. She is the author of "Breaking the Sound Barrier," recently released in paperback and now a New York Times best-seller.

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