Salt Sugar Fat: NY Times Reporter Michael Moss on How the Food Giants Hooked America on Junk Food

Amy Goodman
Democracy Now! / Video Report
Published: Friday 1 March 2013
Every year, people are swayed to ingest about twice the recommended amount of salt and fat—and an estimated 70 pounds of sugar.

Food companies have known for decades that salt, sugar and fat are not good for us in the quantities Americans consume them. But every year, people are swayed to ingest about twice the recommended amount of salt and fat — and an estimated 70 pounds of sugar. We speak with New York Times reporter Michael Moss about how in his new book, "Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us." In a multi-year investigation, Moss explores deep inside the laboratories where food scientists calculate the "bliss point" of sugary drinks or the "mouth feel" of fat, and use advanced technology to make it irresistible and addictive. As a result of this $1 trillion-a-year industry, one-in-three adults, and one-in-five children, are now clinically obese.

GUEST:

Michael Moss, investigative reporter with The New York Times and author of the new book, "Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us." His cover story, "The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food," led last weekend’s Times Sunday magazine. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 2010 for his investigation into the dangers of contaminated meat.



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ABOUT Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman is the host of "Democracy Now!," a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 900 stations in North America. She is the author of "Breaking the Sound Barrier," recently released in paperback and now a New York Times best-seller.

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