Saturday, December 4, 2021

Ethan Vesely-Flad and Rev. John Dear

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Ethan Vesely-Flad is director of national organizing at the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR-USA). He connects and supports FOR members and chapters, builds and strengthens campaigns, and leads the Fellowship's communication strategy. He previously served as editor of The Witness, GraceOnline, and Fellowship magazine, and his writings have also been published in Colorlines, The Source, the Huffington Post, Episcopal Life, and other media outlets. Born in Harlem, raised in Poughkeepsie, and formed in Oakland, Ethan now lives with his family in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville, North Carolina. Rev. John Dear Rev. John Dear is a longtime peace activist, organizer, and former executive director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He is currently the executive director of the Beatitudes Center for the Nonviolent Jesus where he offers regular zoom workshops. He was nominated by Archbishop Desmond Tutu for the Nobel Peace Prize. For more, visit: www.johndear.org

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