Wednesday, February 8, 2023

Sarah Lueck

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Lueck joined the Center in November 2008 as a Senior Policy Analyst. She works on issues related to health reform implementation, specifically health insurance exchanges and private market reforms included in the Affordable Care Act. She is also a consumer representative to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. Before joining the Center, Lueck was a reporter for nine years in the Washington bureau of The Wall Street Journal. For much of that time, she wrote about health policy, including Medicare prescription-drug legislation, state and federal proposals to modify Medicaid and the efforts of health-care companies to influence policy changes. She later covered Congress, writing about tax policy, immigration and economic-recovery legislation, as well as House and Senate election campaigns. A native of Des Moines, Iowa, she graduated from the University of Iowa in Iowa City with a BA in Spanish. You can follow Sarah on Twitter @sarahL202.

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