Sunday, August 7, 2022

Robert Faturechi and Justin Elliott and Ellis Simani

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Robert Faturechi is an investigative reporter at ProPublica. He has reported on industry lobbying campaigns to block safety standards, the Trump administration’s deregulation efforts, self-dealing by political consultants and corporate donors targeting state elections officials. He broke stories on Sen. Richard Burr selling off stock before the coronavirus market crash, and former HHS Secretary Tom Price taking official actions that overlapped with his personal financial interests. In 2020, he and two colleagues won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for a series of stories about avoidable deaths in the Navy and Marine Corps, and the failure of top commanders to heed warnings and implement reforms that could have saved lives. His reporting has resulted in congressional hearings, new legislation, federal indictments and widespread reforms. Before joining ProPublica, he was a reporter at The Los Angeles Times, where his work exposed inmate abuse, cronyism, secret cop cliques and wrongful jailings at the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. In 2013, he obtained an unprecedented cache of confidential personnel records that showed the agency knowingly hired dozens of cops with histories of serious misconduct. His stories helped lead to sweeping reforms at the nation’s largest jail system, criminal convictions of sheriff’s deputies and the resignation of the sheriff. Faturechi lives in Los Angeles and graduated from UCLA in 2008. You can send him story tips and documents through email at Robert.Faturechi@propublica.org or on Signal/WhatsApp at (213) 271-7217. Justin Elliott has been a reporter with ProPublica since 2012, where he has covered business and economics as well as money and influence in politics. He has produced stories for outlets including the New York Times and National Public Radio, and his work has spurred congressional investigations and changes to federal legislation. His work on TurboTax maker Intuit won a Gerald Loeb Award for business journalism. He was also honored with an Investigative Reporters and Editors award for a series on the American Red Cross and, with the Trump Inc. podcast team, a duPont-Columbia Award. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Brown University in history and classics. Justin’s GnuPG/PGP key is available on the Ubuntu keyserver. The key ID is 2C353E48 and the fingerprint is 2305 FAB2 8F0D DEA1 FB4D 176A BDE5 0826 2C35 3E48. He can be reached on Signal and WhatsApp at (774) 826-6240. Ellis Simani is a data reporter. Previously, he was a Scripps Howard data reporting fellow at ProPublica. Before joining ProPublica, he was a Metpro fellow on the Los Angeles Times’ data visualization desk. There, he covered a variety of topics ranging from visualizing environmental issues along California’s coast, to investigating the shortcomings of the Census Bureau’s racial categories. Prior to his work at the Los Angeles Times, Ellis interned with the Seattle Times’ News Apps team, and was a participant in ProPublica’s Data Institute in 2017.

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