5 Endangered Species Dependent on Public Lands for Survival

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SOURCEEcoWatch

Think about our national parks. What comes to mind? Many of us think of spectacular landscapes, family adventures and, of course, incredible wildlife.

These places we love are all of those things, but they are also places created to protect and restore wildlife. Our national parks, wildlife refuges and other wild public lands provide crucial habitat for wildlife, especially endangered species.

The National Wildlife Federation is part of a coalition of more than 40 outdoor and sportsmen’s organizations calling upon candidates seeking public office this November to pledge to protect our public lands and the wildlife that call these places home. Thousands of friends of wildlife have already pledged to protect our wild public lands and wildlife—and urged candidates and politicians to do the same.

Endangered species don’t have representatives in Congress: They need you to speak for them.Take action and ask political leaders and candidates to pledge to protect our public lands!

Meet five of the many incredible endangered species and the public lands they call home.

1. Black-Footed Ferret

1. Black-Footed Ferret

2. Whooping Crane

2. Whooping Crane

3. Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep

3. Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep

4. Piping Plover

4. Piping Plover

5. Hawaiian Monk Seals

5. Hawaiian Monk Seals

With only weeks to go before the November election this is an issue too important to ignore. Urge our political leaders and candidates to pledge to protect our wild public lands.

Tell Congress Not to Sell Our Wilderness to the Highest Bidder

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