Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Jonathan Entin

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Jonathan Entin taught Constitutional Law; Administrative Law; Courts, Public Policy, and Social Change; the Law and Social Science Seminar; Law, Legislation, and Regulation; Mass Media Law; Property; and the Supreme Court Seminar during more than three decades on the faculty. He also served for nearly eight years as the law school’s associate dean for academic affairs. He published more than 100 articles, book chapters, essays, and reviews. He also received ten teaching awards, including the Distinguished Teacher Award of the Law Alumni Association; five graduating classes honored him as Teacher of the Year, and two other classes selected him as Administrator of the Year. A graduate of Brown University (AB) and Northwestern University (JD), he was a law clerk to then-Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg (when she was on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit) and did appellate litigation at Steptoe & Johnson in Washington, D.C., before joining the law faculty in 1984. Professor Entin remains active in the law school, continuing his research and writing on constitutional law and civil rights issues. He also serves as the faculty advisor to the Case Western Reserve Law Review.

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