Can we create a just America?

2020 has awakened the country to the full breadth of the injustices that have plagued us for centuries, and pushed us to the point where transformational change is the only path forward.

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SOURCERobert Reich

Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II explains how we can build on the momentum of local victories for democracy reform, and unrig our system to build a truly just America.

It’s easy to feel downtrodden as every aspect of our broken system is laid bare. As the rights of millions of Americans hang in the balance, it feels more and more like the system is stacked against us.

But we can’t become cynics — we will not give up. Across the country, everyday people have secured structural democracy reforms that have led to major wins that move our country forward.

In Seattle, Missouri, Connecticut, and North Carolina, grassroots coalitions have risen up against the status quo and secured crucial victories in campaign finance reform, expanding Medicaid, raising the minimum wage, and expanding access to the ballot box.

We can build on the momentum of these grassroots victories, and let these activists inspire us to get bold reforms enacted on the federal level. We have the potential to mobilize an historic turnout in this election, giving tens of millions of poor and low wealth eligible voters hope that their participation in this election could lead to real, transformative change.

2020 has awakened the country to the full breadth of the injustices that have plagued us for centuries, and pushed us to the point where transformational change is the only path forward. This election is just the beginning.

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Robert Reich
Robert B. Reich is Chancellor's Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies. He served as Secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration, for which Time Magazine named him one of the ten most effective cabinet secretaries of the twentieth century. He has written fourteen books, including the best sellers "Aftershock", "The Work of Nations," and"Beyond Outrage," and, his most recent, "Saving Capitalism." He is also a founding editor of the American Prospect magazine, chairman of Common Cause, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, co-founder of the nonprofit Inequality Media and co-creator of the award-winning documentary, Inequality for All.

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